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Can this computer run it?

Discussion in 'General' started by Skittles, Sep 20, 2017.

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This last post in this thread was made more than 31 days old.
  1. Skittles Trainee Engineer

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    I'm considering getting a new computer in the near future. I know nothing about which processors and graphics cards are higher than which. Can this run it?
    Thank you.
     
  2. Devon_v Senior Engineer

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    No. Also it's sold out.

    Bundle PCs like that are never a good idea. Be highly suspicious of any PC with a price tag that resembles a console as well. Consoles get away with it because the hardware is sold to you at cost or a slight loss to be made up when you buy into the services and software. PCs at that price point are barely functional. That one in particular has an R5 GPU. We're on RX (as in 10) for AMD, and 1000-series for nVidia.

    If you're serious about SE, you'll want a GPU that costs half of what that whole system does, and you'll be at or around $600 just on core components. PC gaming is not cheap, and if you are not willing to buy in for quality components you'll have such poor performance that you might as well have spent the money on a console and taken advantage of the hyper-optimization console games achive on a single hardware profile.

    A barebones system could perhaps handle SE on absolute minimum settings, but you'll just have to replace close to 80% of the system later on if you want to upgrade.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. JJayzX Trainee Engineer

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    I play it on my laptop that just a dual core i5 with intel hd 620 graphics, runs like crap but works. My main PC is an i7 4770k with a gtx 970 and i run a server on it and game on it and still peg 60 fps on all high. So what i'm saying is you don't need to have anything expensive to just play if you don't have much money to work with.
     
  4. FlakMagnet Senior Engineer

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    1,551
    Best way to build a budget gaming PC is to buy components and put one together. Not ideal for the non tech minded, but it's also not as difficult as you might think.

    Sites like PC Part Picker can be really helpful checking that part A works with part B, and give you guide on cost and effectiveness.

    You can buy ready built PCs that will make decent gaming machines, but they tend to be pricey, and don't always offer scope to expand or update with time.

    As far as playing SE goes, you can play it on a lower end machine, just tailor your expectations in terms of display quality and speed.

    I only game on a desktop...i5 4690, plus 16Gb of RAM and a 6Gb 1060 card. With a 24" monitor and native resolution, I don't care about framerates because the game runs smooth.
     
  5. Devon_v Senior Engineer

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    That system is better than you're giving it credit for. :)
     
  6. FoolishOwl Junior Engineer

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    That video card alone probably costs more than my entire desktop system.
     
  7. Devon_v Senior Engineer

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    The 1060s aren't bad if you can actually find them for MSRP. They're not the $600 ones. At least they aren't when scaplers and coin miners don't have their hands on them. The RX's had the same issue.
     
  8. FlakMagnet Senior Engineer

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    I paid around £230 for my card just before Christmas 2016..... Gigabyte GTX1060 Windforce OC 6Gb. A year on, it's hard to find one under £250. I built the rest of the system around 3 years ago, with a ram upgrade doubling from the 8Gb I had before.

    I am really happy with my rig to be fair. It's never let me down and I don't own a game it can't run well. I specced out what I would need to build something noticeably better today...and had to stop when it hit £1000 .......
     
  9. Ronin1973 Master Engineer

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    4,845
    I'm not an expert on AMD hardware. But here's the low-down.

    Processor speed is king for Space Engineers. The faster your computer can compute, the more efficiently it will run SE. Most consumer computers are four physical cores.

    SE is highly dependent on a single core for MOST of its features. It's now starting to branch out into multi-core functionality. Where having more than four cores might be of value.

    16GB of memory will handle most game worlds. If you're into building truly massive ships you may want more... for 99% of people 16GB will be all that you need.

    For a new computer I would go with a 1060 to 1080.

    Your main drive should be an SSD. It will definitely help with load and save times.

    Intel is releasing their i9's and AMD their Threadripper series. These require brand new motherboards to handle the tech. So you may want to consider them if you have the money to plant your flag in that tech.
     
  10. Jikanta Apprentice Engineer

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    418
    Budget gamer here. My PC with its Quad 2.66 core and 8GB of ram with 1TB HD runs SE well enough. That Cybertron PC will run SE. Not as good as some of your more dedicated upgrade gamers, but it will run it.
     
  11. Levits Senior Engineer

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    2,122
    Nvidia 970 graphics card is more than adequate for any game and not that expensive. MSI variant is the one that I use and it plays everything perfectly fine. $200-$300

    16gb memory is more than enough for any game currently out there. (Cost is maybe less than $100 depending on what you get.)

    The processor is a big one and the most expensive thing that should be in your computer. I5's are good and work perfectly fine. I7's are better but you will pay an arm and some other extremity for it without getting that much more out of it. You can however play games on one of those I3's... (I5 processors go for around $200 give or take.)

    Hard drive is up to you. SSD is indeed better/faster but it depends on how much stuff you want your computer/laptop to hold. Roughly estimated, you can get a normal hard drive with 1tb for the same price as you can a SSD that only has 125gb... or is it 200gb?... (Price is... Cheap- "ish"... around $100 again, depending on what you get.)

    You can get a decent desktop for around $500-$800 that will smoke any console. I spend a ton on my own gaming rig and have not gone back to consoles since. But I also have some cushion room since I spent a bit extra. As of now, I should be safe till the next 2 versions of Xbox-whatever comes out. Still need to upgrade my graphics card... for no reason what so ever other than just to say I have one of the newer ones.

    If you want a laptop I'd personally go with MSI... of course for one of those gaming laptops, you'll likely be dropping around $700-$1000. Well, I suppose you can manage to find some "gaming" laptops out there for around $300-$500. But you will have to have everything on low settings and... even then I can't guarantee that it won't run like crap. SE is very demanding.
     
  12. Devon_v Senior Engineer

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    1,602
    I'm pretty sure that GPU is going to chug hardcore. My old R9-270X couldn't maintain 60FPS on a planet, and that was a pretty decent card for its time.

    Get both. 1TB step motor drives are less than $100US now, a small SSD can be had for around $120. You put bulk stuff on the mechanical and speed sensitive stuff on the SSD.

    I'd start with the SSD, it makes a HUGE difference in boot, loading, and operating speed. My machine still boots faster than the Win7 logo can finish appearing on the screen. You can easily pick up a cheap mechanical later and plug it in.
     
  13. Harlequin Otterdog Trainee Engineer

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    I have to agree, my old Dell XPS laptop has a nvidia 445m in it and it majorly chugs when playing SE on planets. That integrated r5 gpu will probably do better then the 445m, but it'll still very much struggle. Even the r7-360 in my budget build desktop only pulls 40+ fps on planets set to medium.
     
  14. J.R. Ewing Trainee Engineer

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    66
    Ona Laptop with i7 and G730M - CPU 4%, GPU 99% - 6FPS (crap)
    On deskotop with Celeron J1900 and passive GTX750 - CPU 40-90%, GPU 60-80%, 25FPS
     
  15. Devon_v Senior Engineer

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    Most mobile GPUs have very poor shader performance. PBR kills them.
     
  16. FlakMagnet Senior Engineer

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    In my current rig I swapped from old school HD to SSD for the windows 'C' drive. WOW...what a difference. I added a cheap Tb hard drive for long term storage, but having the OS on an SSD allows the PC to boot in seconds and really helps with general performance. I wouldn't have it any other way. SSDs have come down a lot on price too. I don't install 'non essential' programs or stuff on it, which avoids clutter
     
  17. Levits Senior Engineer

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    2,122
    For a laptop, I'd personally go with nothing less than the I5 processor and a 1050 or 1060 graphics card (NOTE: TI versions are better). Of course with just those two pieces of hardware, yer instantly in the $500+ range. (<I'm still holding out for holiday sales >_< ) For a gaming laptop, don't expect your power/battery to last long and keep an eye out on your laptops heat output.

    In addition, NEVER go for an "Integrated" GPU on a laptop; at least if gaming is your thing. Make sure it is "Dedicated". Integrated uses the default RAM of the device, while a Dedicated graphics card has it's own and performs leaps and bounds ahead of any integrated version.

    Ok, there are... I think two... maybe one integrated version that can play Minecraft or something.
     
  18. FlakMagnet Senior Engineer

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    For me .... a laptop isn't a gaming platform. By the time you have squeezed the components in to the little box, it's not a little box anymore. It's bulky, heavy, and chews battery in no time. Then you have the screensize.

    There are times and places where people can argue a gaming laptop makes sense....but for me it does not.
     
  19. Levits Senior Engineer

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    2,122
    Has more to do with "portability". Trust me, If I could mount a screen to the side of my desktop, rather than this 12" x 12" clear window and carry it around, I would. But If you want to be able to go anywhere and not have to lug around a monitor, tower, and a 12volt car battery, your best bet is a laptop. Laptops are certainly overpriced and underpowered vs a desktop, but the fact that you can pickup and go in a moments notice is a very nice aspect and their number one selling point.

    Heck, I want one just because I get bored at work :woot:
     
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